Last updated: April 15. 2014 12:03PM - 669 Views
By - mlasley@civitasmedia.com



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Grayson County residents will be able to safely dispose of unwanted prescription medications during National Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, April 26.


The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 26 under the canopy at the front entrance of the Cave-Bland building of Twin Lakes Regional Medical Center, located at 910 Wallace Avenue in Leitchfield.


The disposal process, coordinated by The Partnership for a Healthy Grayson County and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), is free and completely anonymous, according to Grayson County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent Natalie Taul.


The event serves not only to allow citizens to dispose of unwanted and/or unused prescription drugs but also to promote the use of the permanent prescription lock-boxes in various local law enforcement agencies.


Permanent prescription drug lock-boxes are located at the Grayson County Sheriff’s Office, Leitchfield Police Department, and Caneyville Police Department, and citizens may deposit prescriptions in any of the three agencies’ lock-boxes year-round, said Grayson County Sheriff Rick Clemons.


After the drugs have been collected, they are given to the DEA where they are incinerated, according to Leitchfield Chief of Police Kevin Henderson.


By delivering prescription medications to the police to be destroyed, citizens can help prevent the drugs from making their way to the streets.


According to Henderson, the misuse, abuse, and theft of prescription drugs is not only the biggest problem in Grayson County, it’s also the biggest problem in Kentucky.


Clemons said his department receives complaints regarding the theft of prescription drugs on a weekly basis.


In addition, Henderson said traditional methods for disposing of prescriptions, such as flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash, pose an environmental hazard and safety hazard, respectively.


Flushing prescriptions down the toilet ultimately leads to their introduction into the local water supply, said Clemons.


According to Henderson, prescriptions that have been thrown in the trash still may find their way to the streets, if individuals search dumpsters or other trash receptacles for them.


According to Taul, the DEA is currently in the process of approving new regulations that will implement the Safe and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amends the Controlled Substances Act to allow an “ultimate user” (a patient or their family member or pet owner) of controlled substance medications to dispose of them by delivering them to entities authorized by the Attorney General to accept them.


The act also allows the Attorney General to authorize long-term care facilities to dispose of their residents’ controlled substances in certain instances.


The GCSO is located at 44 Public Square in Leitchfield; the LPD is located at 117 South Main Street in Leitchfield; and the CPD is located in Caneyville City Hall at 104 South Main Street in Caneyville.

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