Matt Lasley | GC News-Gazette Alexandria Fulkerson has pushed for the legalization of medical marijuana as a method of stabilizing her infant daughter Kolbie's medical condition.

Matt Lasley | GC News-Gazette

Alexandria Fulkerson has pushed for the legalization of medical marijuana as a method of stabilizing her infant daughter Kolbie's medical condition.

The Grayson County Fiscal Court on Tuesday voted to adopt a resolution supporting the legalization of medical marijuana in the state of Kentucky.

Leitchfield resident Alexandria Fulkerson stood before the court once again on Tuesday to request that such a resolution be passed, as well as to present the more than 700 petition signatures she obtained from Grayson County residents expressing their support for her cause.

In September, Fulkerson spoke to the court sharing the story of her now 10-month-old daughter, Kolbie, who, after her birth in December 2017, was diagnosed with the rare genetic disorder bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria, which, she said, causes her daughter to suffer from seizures and breathing problems. She has previously undergone a tracheotomy to open up her airway and surgery to establish a gastrostomy tube in order for her to eat.

According to Fulkerson, the use of medical marijuana could help ease her daughter’s symptoms, specifically, calming her brain enough to reduce seizures, and she requested that the Fiscal Court pass a resolution stating it would support a state law that would legalize medical marijuana in Kentucky.

This week, Grayson County Judge-Executive Kevin Henderson, a 27-year veteran of law enforcement, said that, five years ago, he would have been against the legalization of medical marijuana, but, today, he remains open-minded, and, after Fulkerson addressed the Fiscal Court, he felt moved by her story and began researching the issue, speaking to friends in the medical profession and asking citizens for their opinions on the topic.

One of his friends who is a doctor but whom Henderson declined to identify by name, told him that there is "a definite benefit" to medical marijuana as a method of treating various ailments, including nausea, chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis.

On the topic of pain management, Fulkerson said it would take several months for her daughter to stabilize if she were taken off of her pain medications because her mind is already addicted to them.

As for a resolution supporting the legalization of medical marijuana, Henderson said he would like to see language that states it would not support the recreational use of marijuana, something he is against; however, as someone whose father passed away due to alcohol abuse, he feels that alcohol is a far worse drug than marijuana.

"As far as I'm concerned, I am wholeheartedly for your child," said Henderson, adding that he does not feel it is legislators' responsibility to be in the business of telling a doctor and a patient what is best for the patient.

3rd District Magistrate Brenda Huffman said she had never held an opinion as to whether medical marijuana should be legalized until her husband was diagnosed with cancer.

"You don't know what the future may hold," said Huffman, who added that she was affected by Fulkerson's story, and, while she also does not support the recreational use of marijuana, she does support its medical use.

6th District Magistrate Curtis Wells said he supports the legalization of medical marijuana "100 percent," and 2nd District Magistrate Presto Gary said he would also support the passage of a resolution provided it includes language stating medical marijuana would be used only by individuals who receive a prescription for it from a doctor.

Following discussion, the Fiscal Court voted unanimously to pass a resolution showing that Grayson County would support a state bill to legalize medical marijuana in Kentucky.

Grayson County Coroner Joe Brad Hudson, at the discussion's conclusion, said he has signed more than 1,000 death certificates, many of which were the result of drug overdoses, but he has never signed a death certificate that was issued as the result of marijuana.